Summary and best wishes

This is the final installment in the more-or-less daily Technology Supported Learning workshop. The TSL workshop covers a lot of material that can be used in many ways within conventional classroom teaching as well as in hybrid, blended or fully online learning.

You have had an opportunity to be a participant as well as a course developer. I hope that you have had some new and interesting learning experiences yourself, and that these will encourage you to enhance your own courses.

Please take some time to review what we have covered and consider how technology can contribute to your students’ learning and success.

  • Review your course against the entire Course Evaluation Checklist. How are you doing? Are there specific areas that will help your students engage in your course content? Are there specific actions that you can take that will contribute to supporting learning and retention?
  • Looking back at your introduction and expectations, how would you summarize your learning experience? What were your expectations when you started this course? Have your expectations been met? What one thing could YOU have done differently that you would have benefited from?

There are no right answers, but there are lots of good ideas.

Thanks for sharing.

All the best,
..Valerie

7.3 diversity

Students’ contribution to course development

Students are very generous with their time and their knowledge. Asking students to participate in enhancing or updating course materials can yield some great results. Ask them for feedback about assignments. Include assignments that require research to find new resources to update the course. Include optional or extra credit assignments that encourage students to “teach” something they have learned.

You could be the next DeAnza star

The DeAnza Media Center is available to help instructors create video or audio to enhance course material. This may be as simple as recording a weekly reading of student work with comments. Some faculty have developed extensive videos to demonstrate medical procedures and practices to prepare students for actual clinical work.

Learn more… Catalyst / Moodle

DeAnza Distance Learning Center

Moodle documents

 

7.2 ways of learning

Edit profile

Students are usually asked to edit their profile in Moodle. It is also possible for the site administrator to edit users’ profiles. These instructions reflect the 1.9 format of the user’s page for the site administrator. A student has a shorter list.

Course settings

Settings.gifCourse settings control how the things appear to the participants in a course. It is the first page viewed after creating a course. It can be edited through the Settings link in the Course administration block menu. This page has links to other pages that may describe a setting in more detail. Different versions of Moodle may not have all the settings listed below.

7.1 Respect diverse talents and ways of learning

Learning styles, modality, cultural influence – all play significant roles in the differences in students within a class. One of the most exciting aspects of technology enhanced instruction is the ability to provide learning experiences that acknowledge and encourage this diversity, in ways that are not practical, or even possible, in traditional classroom teaching.

Enhancing Instruction

One big advantage of using technology is instructional reproducibility – the delivery will be the same every time. Over time, the lessons, the activities, the media can be built and improved on. It is possible to offer the same material in multiple formats to capitalize on many ways of learning.

Adaptive Technology

DeAnza provides support to individuals with disabilities through a broad range to resources to help them through education and training. People with disabilities are able to participate more fully in work and careers through the use of Adaptive Technology. Here are some websites with good information on Adaptive Technology.

6.3 communication

Tracking Students

Tracking student participation is made easy. Tracking access to course content, responses to quiz questions, discussion participation, grade point totals – all are readily available for viewing and analysis.

  • attendance – not logging in for 10 days “counts” as 3 or more unexcused absences
  • log of messages to students – record of conversation
  • quiz response report – are students understanding the concepts that this question test? Should the questions be changed? Should the teaching be changed?

Students – profile, activities

There is a lot of information about individual students that is accessible from the student profiles

  • Profile
  • Forum posts
  • Blog
  • Notes
  • Activity reports

Reports

The Report page allows the teacher or administrator to look at course/site logs and user activity reports. Report Icon link.JPG can be found in the administration block. Site reportsare available to users who have been assigned administrative role (privileges). This page will focus upon course reports, but both site and course reports are similar in the way they operate.

The displayed logs will show active links to other parts of the course. These include the user’s profile, or a specific page in an activity or a link to a resource.

Students have expectations too…

Are YOU and your course meeting your students’ expectations? Do you know what students are expecting from a technology enhanced instructor? Ask them. Including frequent surveys or critical thinking assignments that ask students about their own learn experience in your course environment are wonderful sources of information and insight. You are not required to act on their suggestions, as some may not be practical or support your course objectives, but some are really useful.

6.1 Communicate high expectations

Setting High expectations for students lets them know that this important and interesting. Being clear about what you are asking them to do directs their actions. Students coming to higher education at a community college vary enormously in background, recent academic experience and motivation for learning the subject. Expectations can be presented and reinforced through evaluation, communication, and modeling.

Research has shown that a teacher’s expectations have a powerful effect on a student’s performance. If you act as though you expect your students to be motivated, hardworking, and interested in the course, they are more likely to be so.

Set realistic expectations for students when you make assignments, give presentations, conduct discussions, and grade examinations. “Realistic” in this context means that your standards are high enough to motivate students to do their best work but not so high that students will inevitably be frustrated in trying to meet those expectations. To develop the drive to achieve, students need to believe that achievement is possible -which means that you need to provide early opportunities for success.
–from Motivating Students
http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/motiv.htm

Grading Rubrics

Rubrics or explicit descriptions of grading criteria help students determine what is expected of them for a particular assignment, and can determine if they have adequately fulfilled the requirements. Rubrics take the guess work out of the assignment definition and grading process. Publishing the rubric along with the assignment helps set expectations.